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Counselling and coaching are two very similar processes, and as a psychologist and ex-counsellor, I do bring the best of both into the coaching situation.

I often work with people who are having marriage difficulties, are confused, hurt, lost and bewildered.

What the clients find is that the coaching sessions give them the place to explore what’s really going on for themselves, and with others in their lives (as the two are inextricably interlinked), and in between sessions they make even more progress by doing effective tasks to move them closer towards their goal (their aims for counselling/coaching).

These clients come back each session having grown and learnt a lot about themselves and their relationships and their life.  They come to realise what’s been holding them back from living the life they want and start doing what they need to in order to be happy and mentally healthy.

The key difference between coaching and counselling is that coaching focuses on the doing as well as the talking.  It is the reason I receive referrals from NHS GPs for NHS patients looking for private counselling or coaching – because of the speed and effectiveness of coaching.

You can realistically begin fixing your marriage problems (whether you attend alone or as a couple) and your relationship with yourself within a few coaching sessions.  A major reason I could not remain a counsellor was because I didn’t feel I was helping people anywhere near as much as I could, or anywhere near as quickly as I knew I could; I knew I could do the same and so much more for my clients by being their coach rather than counsellor.

As a life coach specialising in relationships, I am incredibly skilled at helping my clients achieve their aims and you will learn new things about yourself that are very important to helping you move forward, from the very first session you attend!

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